Annunaki Plan / Human Plan?

Displaying photo.JPGI discovered this little gem at the central library in Edinburgh. “The Annunaki Plan? or The Human Plan?” was self-published by Chris Thomas in 2010, who appears to be based in Wales. He has produced a number of other books, before and afterwards, on alternative histories, “earth mysteries” and healing, and most interestingly for me, books which link ancient alien narratives and millennialism. As much of my work demonstrates, this synchretism (or I prefer discursive transfer) frequently involves the mobilisation of conspiracy narratives, and so I want to present this little volume as an example of the field of millennial conspiracism, showing that it encapsulates many of the features of this field.

It begins “most people are aware that something is changing, this change occurring on every possible level of our existence” (6). But we are extolled that we must choose what the outcome of this change is to be – for good or for ill. This exemplifies a millennial-apocalyptic tension which is typical of the field. David Icke and Alex Jones also frequently demonstrate this kind of tension, where the global awakening is seemingly caused by the consspirators’ plan reaching its ”endgame’. Typically, we are being deliberately misled by at-this-point-unspecified conspirators into making a choice leading to destruction. In fact, the author alleges they have made attempts against his life (7). Perhaps unsurprisingly, the terminal point for this decision to be made is (was) the 21st of December, 2012.

The book then goes on to recount an account of human history, “as recorded in the Akashic” records (9), which Thomas claims debunks the Annunaki narrative of Zecharia Sitchin et al. In Sitchin’s account, aliens from Niburu – a hitherto unknown planet orbiting our sun on a 10,000 year elliptical orbit – descended to Earth in prehistory to mine gold, subjugating humanity in the process. The Annunaki became revered as gods, becoming present-day elites as they hid their bloodlines in royal dynasties and secret societies. Thomas calls this account a “fantasy” (17), and describes a more neoplatonic, Theosophical account of the creation of the cosmos, Atlantis, the Pyramids, etc, and a Velikovsy-inspired account of a prehistoric catastrophe in the solar system (31-50).

Instead, the Akashic tells him that the Annunaki originate on a planet “23 galaxies away from ours” (24). The Annunaki, along with the Hathor, are groups within a race of energetic beings called the Velon, who headed for Earth only 300 years ago – because it is “God’s chosen planet” (26). The Hathor began to contact humans through channelling, whereas the Annunaki began monitoring us through implants, and to create bodies with a human appearance. From this data, they began to promote the story a la Sitchin, designed to appeal to human religious impulses. Sitchin was innocent of the deception, Thomas notes, as the Annunaki had travelled back in time to plant fabricated cuneiform tablets (27-8). They established the Illuminati, the Freemasons and the reformed Knights Templar, all of whom worked covertly together to establish the socialist New World Order (30). The EU, the Bilderberg Group, all scientists and academics (especially those supporting climate change), Al Qaeda, HAARP, the Theosophical Society and practically every element of the conspiracy theory milieu are in the pay of the Annunaki (54-66).

However, Thomas claims a second plan was put into place by the enlightened humans of 7000 years ago, in which it was agreed that our souls would be repeatedly reincarnated until we learned to live properly, at which point our souls and physical bodies will reintegrate, we would be free of disease and enlightened. However, a time limit was set… 2012 (52). He claims that some 4.5 million humans in isolated communities have already achieved this aim since 2003, but that time is running out for the rest of us, and the Annunaki plan is there to distract us from the urgency. Thomas sets out his advice to achieve soul reintegration: working through our emotional blockages to clear our chakras.

So, in 90-odd pages we have a sweeping history of the cosmos, and human life, at odds with both scientific and religious consensus; ancient aliens, linking this alternative archaeological narrative to UFOs; an Annunaki Plan which links these further to the New World Order and Illuminati; a date-specific teleological narrative, combining millennial and apocalyptic components; and a dualistic Gnostic narrative of salvation through special knowledge. Quite an inventive and unique bricolage. His most unique contribution is to make the Annunaki Plan a la Sitchin a part of the deception. Yet in another way, quite typical, inasmuch as these various structural elements seem always to appear in some form or another. For every David Icke or Jim Marrs, there will be scores of small-press or internet entrepreneurs like Thomas, not to mention their hundreds of thousands of subscribers, each with a slightly different take on the material, and their own favoured theory. It is sometimes said of loosely-structured milieux such as millennial conspiracism or New Age that, as they lack a central organisation and a formal creedo, they become an “anything goes” smorgasbord – or perhaps more accurately, given the frequent disparaging comments about their economies, a supermarket deli counter. Yet it isn’t the case, as Thomas’ book shows. We might not know how everything goes together exactly, but we can be reasonably sure what elements to expect, and which would never make an appearance, so there is a commonality there. Thomas is like a jazz musician who is improvising a familiar tune but trying to twist the melody into a unique shape. It’s just that he never made it out of the club circuit.

Footage of Jim Jones preaching

Some interesting footage of Jim Jones preaching at the People’s Temple in Redwood, California, in the 1970s. I’m presuming that, as you’re reading this blog, you’re aware of Jim Jones. Or the Jonestown Massacre, at least.

Some interesting things here; that god is socialism, and the God of the Christians is a sky god; the open admission that he is using religion to destroy religion; and an obvious and somewhat contrary deification of Jones himself. But the singing is great – he’s like a young Marxist brainwashy Johnny Cash.

Presentation: Universalising the Other: Reptilians, the New Age and Globalisation

Here, for your delectation, is my presentation from the British Sociological Association Sociology of Religion study group – SOCREL – conference, 2012, entitled Universalising the Other: Reptilians, the New Age and Globalisation. It was part of a panel on “Religious Conspiracies” which I organised. Here’s the abstract:

This paper examines belief systems which emerged during the 1990s and broadened their appeal over the last decade, blending popular conspiracy theories with New Age narratives. Typically, they propose that an occluded elite work to controll and oppress humanity, physically aand spiritually, but that when enough individuals become cognisant of their oppression, the transformation and emancipation of humanity will occur. Using David Icke’s notorious Reptilian thesis as an example, I argue that these metaphysical conspiracist narratives present a conception of the Other which locates the origin of social inequity in non-human agencies, rather than ethnic or ideological differences. Thus, Icke creates a popular theodicy which accounts for the problem of evil within a globalised and pantheistic worldview. i argue that Icke’s thesis – and metaphysical conspiracism more broadly – is an attempt to explain away the failure of the New Age and the Enlightenment project more broadly to create a world of peace and plenty in the 20th Century.

As you listen to the audio (player below), you can follow the powerpoint slides on the embedded player underneath. I hope you enjoy.

Awake and Aware Q&A Panel

The Awake and Aware conference 2013 (hosted by Project Camelot) was held April 5-7th in Glendale, California. It claims to have been “very likely the first conference of its kind to bring together scientists, researchers, whistleblowers with experience working in above top secret black projects dealing with Time Travel. We are talking about Jump Rooms to Mars, the Moon as well as underground bases and cities connected by high speed maglev trains where you go from Pine Gap Australia to Los Alamos National Labs in minutes rather than hours. We are talking about a Secret Space program operating under cover of secrecy that is going Interstellar and terraforming other planets… These speakers will talk about how the Secret Government travels… by using zero point energy and hyper dimensional physics to negotiate reality in ways we have only dreamed of…”

The speakers included David Wilcock, Jordan Maxwell, “Face on Mars” exponent Richard Hoagland, and Bashar, “a multi-dimensional extraterrestrial being who speaks through channel Darryl Anka from what we perceive as the future”.

The reason I’ve put this up is because of the various responses to the failed prophecy of 2012. Some  have gone for the classic “We must have prevented it” gambit, and Hoagland goes for the “The date was off – it’s actually 2015!”  But some of the others are quite novel. That we are moving into different “time-streams”, for example, and in some of those the date of ascension is different. Or that it’s still coming, but moves further into the future depending on our level of awakening.

And I love Wilcock’s admission that he was gobsmacked when we didn’t go into ascension in 2012.

News in Brief

It’s been a pretty busy time for me of late. I’m just back (and recovering) from the British Sociological Association’s Sociology of Religion Study Group (SOCREL)’s annual conference, which this year was held in Durham. As well as a few recordings for the Religious Studies Project, I presented a paper entitled Body Bags and Seed Banks: A Material Approach to Conspiracist Apocalypticism as part of the panel Materiality, Secrecy and the End of the World with Joseph Webster and Timothy Jenkins of Cambridge University. Great fun and very interesting; Joe I’ve known for a while, and I consider him a very talented anthropologist, and Tim I met for the first time, but hope to talk more with him in future. I may work the paper up for publication later.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The conference also gave me the opportunity to see my latest publication “in the wild” – “(Always) Living in the End-Times: The Rolling Prophecy of the Conspiracist Milieu” in the INFORM/Ashgate volume Prophecy in the New Millennium.

Conference and RSP aside, publications have been the major reason why I’ve been so busy in the last couple of months. A paper on David Icke will be coming out in the next issue of the International Journal for the Study of New Religions, and I’ve also been preparing a long paper on Whitley Strieber for Nova Religio. I have one more conference in May, but from now until September, I’ll be concentrating on my PhD. The next chapter – on David Icke – needs to be finished this month.

First Thoughts on David Icke at Wembley Arena

Where the Dreamland Festival had been semi-academic and familial, my fieldwork at Icke’s London Wembley Arena presentation on Saturday, 27th of October 2012, could hardly have been more different in terms of atmosphere and setting. Rather than 120 attendees, there were close to 6000, and instead of a leafy Gothic retreat in southern USA, we were in London’s cavernous Wembley Arena. What’s more, it was bitterly cold, and it turned out that the queue I was in was not getting into the venue, due to a broken ticket scanner. It did give me a chance to listen in to some of the conversations going on around me.

A group of young men immediately behind me got talking to an older couple about Icke. This was their first time seeing him live, they said, although they had all watched his previous presentations online. Their friend had got them into it, they said, “he’s the real nutter”. The chap from the older couple laughed; “well, we’re all nutters here.”

“I’m surprised to see so many couples here,” he then opined. “Women don’t tend to be so awake.”

Eventually we were told to go to one of the other entrances, so we marched round to the front, and arrived at our seats just in time to catch the closing seconds of Gareth Icke’s opening set. Although I had a clear view of the stage, the steep and already almost full arena made getting to my seat awkward. I tried to get a bit of chat going with the others around me, but unlike Dreamland, people were keeping themselves to themselves.

The choice to have his son’s band play at the gig was criticised later by a few people; they thought it was “selling out”. The situation is certainly more complex than this, however; as already noted, Gareth is a director of Icke’s estate, and it cannot be coincidental that he released the single “Remember Who You Are” at the same time as his father’s book of the same title. Whatever his other faults (open to debate), Icke has always been a proud and attentive parent, promoting his children’s activities through his website, and his Ryde flat is adorned with soft toys for his grandchildren’s amusement. What is perhaps more surprising is that Gareth is prepared to throw his lot in with his father’s ideas quite so much.

Other than that, however, the show was typical of his later presentations; three sections, beginning with the “spiritworld – holographic universe” material, through the Illuminati, into Reptilians and then back to the real world, with practical applications. The first section moved extremely slowly. As has been the case since his earliest books, we got a potted history of Icke’s personal history, and a lot of speculative physics about how the universe is a hologram. One of the two women on my right dozed off, and latecomers trickled in throughout the first hour. The room was vast. Someone had brought a baby, which cried throughout.

In the second section, Icke started talking about the Illuminati. I was very interested in how the reptilian material was received; was this, as several reporters have suggested, something which put people off Icke’s other idea? Well, my experience suggests otherwise. The room fell quieter than would be possible through random means. The two ladies who had slept through the first section suddenly woke up; I saw several of the couples around me cuddling up. Two solutions suggested themselves; 1) the couples had bonded over the reptilian thesis, and the fact that they shared something dangerous was part of their shared identity, or 2) the reptilian thesis provided a meeting point between the conspiracist and New Age people. Nor can this really be explained by the suggestion that people are drawn to the more outlandish material for entertainment; given that you could watch any of his previous presentations on the internet for free, it would be an expensive night out, even if you lived in London to start with.

I was surprised, however, that he didn’t milk the Jimmy Savile aspect more. Given that it was the main story in the popular press at that time, including the more conservative (small c) outlets like the BBC and the Daily Mail, it would have seemed an obvious opportunity for Icke to argue that the mainstream media had caught up with him; yet he showed unusual restraint.

Towards the end of this section, he added some new material. Human Race, Get Off Your Knees had introduced the idea of the hollow Moon, and Remember Who You Are had added Saturn into the mix; Icke claims that Saturn is not only the origins of the term “Satan” and “Satanism”, but also of the idea of the Black Sun. The Reptilian frequencies are broadcast from Saturn and amplified by the Moon, and this Saturn-Moon matrix is an important aspect of the control mechanism through which we are controlled. I could not but think of Gurdjieff during this section; he wrote that most humans were unconscious, and that their emotions were “food for the moon”.

Perhaps as interesting, although less obvious, was his increasing use of terms taken from gnosticism. In particular, he several times referred to the highest powers of the Illuminati as “Archons”, rather than reptilians. Was this a way of distancing himself from the reptilian thesis without abandoning it altogether?

After a second break, (I retired to the bar), the third section proceeded as it has since 2003 or so; how these ideas might be taken into the real world. This particular performance added a new coda, however. A number of musicians were brought out, and Icke led a sing-along. Not only that, but he performed his “non-complidance”, and invited anyone in the audience to join him if they wanted to. I was frankly surprised at his energy, given that he’s in his fifties, suffering from arthritis and in no way slender. Moreover, it was a brave move given that this was his highest profile performance to date.

So; still talking about reptilians; still surprisingly New Age; moving noticeably towards gnostic terminology; still very energetic and a skilled orator. And, need I point it out; ETs, conspiracies and New Age…

David Wilcock interviewed by Project Camelot

I’m developing a bit a fascination with David Wilcock. He first came to the attention of the public after claiming (though he says, reluctantly) that he was the reincarnation of American “sleeping prophet”, Edgar Cayce. Since then, he has gone on to stage many speaking events (called “convergences”), and to publish a book, The Source Field Investigations. He has toned down the channelling aspect to emphasise a conspiracist narrative about a battle raging between the financial Illuminati and benevolent extraterrestrials. His website, divinecosmos.com, has become one of the largest sites to merge conspiracy theories with spiritual ideas. Of particular interest is the way in which UFOs once again act as a bridge between New Age and Conspiracist milieux.

Here’s an interview recorded in 2007, by Kerry Cassidy of Project Camelot. The moment where he describes being taken into a back room at a UFO convention and told the whole truth is at the beginning of the second hour: